Tag: Stanford

Race, Privilege, and Recall: How the Campaign Against Judge Persky Makes Our System Even More Unfair

Authors Akiva Friedlin and Emi Young point out how the recall campaign of Judge Persky has been constructed by distortions of the law and misleading arguments. For example, the current critique of Persky by the campaign is that immigration consequences of a defendant was considered in how the case was resolved in a plea deal. Yet the consideration of immigration consequences has been codified by law, legislation, policies of District Attorney offices, and of course the immigrant rights movement.

Don't Judge Persky Decision, or Any Sentence, in a Vacuum

Before retiring as a public defender, Aram James handled thousands of probation violations. In his essay, he writes that to fully evaluate Judge Persky's sentence of Brock Turner, the public needs to account for what being on probation really means to those convicted of a crime.

How Our Limited Options for “Justice” Around the Brock Turner Sentence Only Punishes Communities of Color

As a community organizer who works with families whose loved ones are facing the criminal court system, Charisse Domingo has sat through many sentencing hearings in Santa Clara County -- the same court system that housed Brock Turner's trial and sentence. But unlike the Turner case, the outrage at the court system she has repeatedly witnessed was about how punitive sentences tore apart the lives of families of color. In her essay, she writes that while she understands the impulse to recall Judge Persky as an effort to challenge white privilege in the courts, it will ironically only further increase incarceration rates in communities of color.

Stanford Law School Graduates Submit Letter to Reconsider Recall Effort of Judge Persky

The following letter was sent to Stanford University's Professor Michelle Dauber -- the law professor leading the recall campaign to remove Judge Aaron Persky. The letter was signed by 53 graduating Stanford Law students, representing nearly a third of the total class of 180 students.
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